Do you like to re-read?

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In her book On Rereading, Patricia Meyer Spacks notes that the pleasure of re-visiting our favorite authors and books is one of mingled familiary and surprise. “By definition, rereading reacquaints us with the familiar. It does so, often, by defamiliarizing. The book we thought we knew challenges us to incorporate fresh elements in our understanding. The book we loved in childhood provides delights we never anticipated. We thought we already knew what it was about, but now it tells us that it is about something else. As our memories inform our understanding, that understanding changes. We who love rereading love it for its surprises as well as for its stability.”

“We do not enjoy a story fully at the first reading,”  C.S. Lewis stated provocatively in his essay “On Stories” (1947). “Not till the curiosity, the sheer narrative lust, has been given its sop and laid asleep, are we at leisure to savour the real beauties. Til then, it is like wasting great wine on a ravenous natural thirst which merely wants cold wetness. The children understand this well when they ask for the same story over and over again, and in the same words.”

“I, too, feel the need to reread the books I have already read,” remarks a character in Italo Calvino‘s great novel If On a Winter’s Night a Traveler, “but at every rereading, I seem to be reading a new book, for the first time. Is it I who keep changing and seeing new things of which I was not previously aware? Or is reading a construction that assumes form, assembling a great number of variables, and therefore something that cannot be repeated twice according to the same pattern?”

Rebecca Mead‘s The Road to Middlemarch: My Life With George Eliot is an especially lovely tribute to the fine art of re-reading. “There are books,” she writes, “that seem to comprehend us just as much as we understand them, or even more. There are books that grow with the reader as the reader grows, like a graft to a tree.”

“A truly great book,” said the novelist Robertson Davies, “should be read in youth, again in maturity and once more in old age, as a fine building should be seen by morning light, at noon and by moonlight.”

Books by Recommended books by Italo Calvino, Rebecca Mead, and Patrcia Meyer Spacks

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